Ukraine: six months conflict and thousands of displaced people

Destroyed building in Serhiivka, Ukraine. Destroyed building in Serhiivka, Ukraine. Caitlin KELLY/ICRC

16 September 2022

Few days ago, after six months of conflict, the ICRC reported several testimonies of Ukrainian people affected by the current war.

 

On the 16 of September, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) published an article titled “Voices from Ukraine: Where homes are destroyed, and medical care is far away”, reporting testimonies of Ukrainian people in different cities, who have been affected by the conflict. One aspect that all four women interviewed have in common is that all were injured during an attack and all their homes have been damaged, forcing them to move elsewhere.

The first woman interviewed is Vera; she is from Mykolaiv, a city in Ukraine two hours outside of Odessa. She says that while she was picking mushrooms, soldiers opened fire and a shrapnel pierced her chest and arm and concerning her current situation, she said that “I have nowhere else to stay. I can't go back because there is nothing to go back to. It's been completely razed to the ground.” The second woman is named Tatyana and is currently at a hospital in Moldova. Tatyana, her daughter, and her grandchildren were victims of a tremendous attack at the train station, in which her daughter was killed. The third woman is Ludmila, who lost her right leg and now is recovering at a Moldova hospital and because of her health's decline and her inability to seek medical care, also the other leg is now in danger. The last woman is Valentina, and she described the terrible night when her building in Serhiivka was damaged and she talks about their neighborhoods and friends, and who died. 

With these interviews, the ICRC wanted to underline the negative impact of this conflict on the civilian population, but also the need for the international community to do more to improve the situation in the country after 6 months of conflict and thousands of displaced people.

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by Alexia Tennariello

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