The number of children affected by the conflict in Yemen is growing

A mother holding a child A mother holding a child Photo by Joel Carillet on iStock.

20 March 2021

The escalating conflict in Yemen has resulted in an increase in the number of casualties over the past month, particularly among children.

According to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), eight children were killed and 33 wounded in March, following an increase in violence along the frontlines of the conflict in Yemen. In addition, Philippe Duamelle, UNICEF Representative in Yemen, has declared in a statement that the numbers could be much higher than those ascertained by the United Nations (UN). Attacks on civilians and civilian infrastructure, such as hospitals and schools, represent a serious violation of International Humanitarian Law, which has become a recurrent aspect of the ongoing clashes in the country.

Most events of violence against children took place in the Governorates of Taiz and Al Hudaydah, although UNICEF has also reported incidents in the Governorates of Al Bayda, Al Dhale'e, Ibb and Marib. The Yemeni population is suffering the most serious humanitarian crisis in the world, and children are the main victims, with 11.3 million children in need of humanitarian assistance and protection, according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

In 2021, the conflict reached its sixth year and, despite attempts by the international community to negotiate, the situation does not seem to have reached any turning point. Philippe Duamelle condemned the recent attacks on civilians, calling on the parties to the conflict to respect International Humanitarian Law and ensure the protection of the most vulnerable.

 

To know more, please read:

https://news.un.org/en/story/2021/03/1087882

https://www.unicef.org/yemen/press-releases/eight-children-killed-and-33-injured-attacks-yemen

https://www.savethechildren.net/news/yemen-quarter-all-civilian-casualties-are-children

 

Author: Francesca Mencuccini; Editor: Carla Leonetti

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